Browse Items (43 total)

  • Collection: Historic Bethabara Park Archaeology Collection

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Trivets were a type of kiln furniture used to support glazed objects. Trivets were made three ways in Bethabara. They could be turned on a potter’s wheel and shaped with a knife like this one, molded by hand, or made with a plaster press mold.

An…

Bethabra-01918.jpg
Trivets were a type of kiln furniture used to support glazed objects. Trivets were made three ways in Bethabara. They could be molded by hand like this one, turned on a potter’s wheel and shaped with a knife, or made with a plaster press mold.

An…

Bethabra-01918.jpg
Trivets were a type of kiln furniture used to support glazed objects. Trivets were made three ways in Bethabara. They could be molded by hand like this one, turned on a potter’s wheel and shaped with a knife, or made with a plaster press mold.

An…

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This jug was recovered from the Krause-Butner Potter site by archaeologist Jacqueline R. Fehon. It is made of red clay, and covered with white slip on the interior and exterior. It has been bisque fired, and likely broke before it could be glazed. …

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This redware jug was recovered in the bisque state. It likely broke during the first firing and was never glazed. The body is only .125” thick. The reddish-buff clay is typical of that mined by Aust in Bethabara. A number of similar fragments were…

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In 1773, William Ellis arrived in Bethabara and offered to teach Gottfried Aust how to make English Staffordshire-style earthenware in exchange for clothing and lodging. Ellis had been the superintendent of John Bartlam’s China Manufactory and…

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In 1773, William Ellis arrived in Bethabara and offered to teach Gottfried Aust how to make English Staffordshire-style earthenware in exchange for clothing and lodging. Ellis had been the superintendent of John Bartlam’s China Manufactory and…

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This cup, classified as a teacup by archaeologist Jacqueline Fehon, was recovered from the Krause-Butner Potter site. It is made of white, or kaolin clay, with slight redish mottling and was thrown on a potter’s wheel. The body is quite delicate as…

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Cream and milk pots were the most commonly produced item in the Wachovia potteries. This style of pottery is commonly known today as a crock. While both cream and milk pots appeared on pottery shop inventories, the elements which distinguished the…

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This candle holder is made of redware with a brown manganese glaze on the top surfaces. The underside is unglazed, aside for areas where trails of glaze ran down the sides. This piece was thrown on a potter’s wheel by Gottfried Aust.

A number of…